How Oral Health Affects The Rest Of Your Body

Interestingly enough, diseases of the mouth affect what goes on with the rest of your body: much was discovered between 2002 and 2012 about the link between oral and body health. Maintaining good mouth care has a greater importance than you may realize.

 

Oral Health Functions

Your mouth, along with the rest of your body, contains bacteria. Good oral health and the body’s natural defenses help keep bacteria under control. An increase in oral bacteria leads to infections which create gum disease and tooth decay.

 

The saliva in your mouth aids in washing away food and counteracts the acid produced by oral bacteria. When this bacteria is not controlled, diseases ensue. Good mouth care is essential in this event as certain types of medications like decongestants, antihistamines, painkillers, diuretics, and antidepressants decrease saliva.

 

Conditions And Diseases Associated With Poor Dental Health

Not performing regular brushing and flossing causes decayed teeth and gum disease, leading to bad breath, which adversely affects how you view yourself. Improper care of your mouth also leads to issues associated with pain disruptions: the inability to eat properly, the lack of sleep, and poor concentration.

 

Unfortunately, diabetes creates gum disease by reducing blood flow that weakens the gums enough to become infected. Since diabetes also increases the sugar levels in the blood, poorly maintained levels support bacterial growth. A 2011 study provides a way for dentists to discover diabetes: such findings would assist those unaware of having diabetes. Both diabetes and HIV/AIDS decrease the body’s ability to resist infection, thus increasing oral diseases.

 

When you have germs or bacteria flowing through your bloodstream, a heart condition such as endocarditis, due to the germs or bacteria creating damage to your heart. Research has suggested that heart disease, clogged arteries, and stroke may also be linked to oral infections.

 

While studies have shown that an increase in preterm birth is related to periodontal disease, a 2011 Australian study discovered a link between the periodontal disease and an increase in the length of time a woman could conceive. There is no proof that gum infections cause preterm birth, yet the speculation is that the body’s immune response could start an early labor.

 

Additional conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, as well as, head and neck cancers could be associated with oral health and eating disorders. Also, a condition known as Sjogren’s syndrome brings on dry mouth.

 

As you can see, taking care of your mouth and seeing your dentist on a regular basis is a major step to your overall health and well-being. For more information on the basics of good oral care, talk to a professional at Stones River Dental or a dentist in your area.

the author

“Brooke Chaplan is a freelance writer and blogger. She lives and works out of her home in Los Lunas, New Mexico. She loves the outdoors and spends most her time hiking, biking and gardening. For more information contact Brooke via Twitter @BrookeChaplan.”

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